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D A L Í — Salvador Dalí August 27, 2016

Posted by anagasto in art, drawing, painting, Spain.
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dalí christ of the cross fragment

His complete name was Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, Marquis of Púbol.

He claimed to be of Arab descent — not hard to believe in Spain where Arabs ruled for nearly 800 years and left evidence of their presence in architecture and art, and in the Spanish language everywhere.

>>>> En español >>>> http://anagasto.wordpress.com/2013/05/02/dali-marques-de-pubol/

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dali

It is very difficult to find a picture of him where he is not clowning.

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salvador_dali_flower_moustache

Politically he was cautious — or understood he had to be. Those were rough times.

At the start of WWII he left Europe for the United States where he became again a Catholic, but all his life he was famous as a wizard and a nut.

“When I paint, the Ocean roars”, Dalí said, and the ocean must have been overjoyed to hear it. Dalí was looking for beauty and for a certain kind of elusive blue that he had once discovered in a Vermeer or a Leonardo.

salvador_dali and cat

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Dalí Atomicus

Salvador_Dali_A_(Dali_Atomicus)_09633u

Photo by Halsman in public domain at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Salvador_Dali_A_%28Dali_Atomicus%29_09633u.jpg depicting three cats flying, water thrown from a bucket, an easel, a footstool and Salvador Dalí all seemingly suspended in mid-air. The title of the photograph is a reference to Dalí’s work Leda Atomica placed to the right of the photograph behind the two cats.

Dalí had a glass floor installed in a room near his studio to study foreshortening from above and from below.

And he pursued alchemy or astrology and dug into all kinds of esoterics, psycho freaking, Babylonian wisdom and boudoir religions where, they say, he found inspiration and symbols for his paintings.

He said the vision of the melting watches came to him when a piece of Camembert melted on his plate at a local restaurant in summer on the coast.

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Christ of Saint John of the Cross

Christ_of_Saint_John_of_the_Cross ll … ….

The copyright to this image is owned by Glasgow City Council. Which is right?

I have been told that  the boat and the fisherman are inspired by Velazquez who was, let’s say, Dalí’s guardian angel.

According to Dalí, the painting was inspired by a sketch made by Saint John of the Cross

John_of_the_Cross_crucifixion_sketch

Saint John’s sketch  is in public domain according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John_of_the_Cross_crucifixion_sketch.jpg

This  painting was bought for US$ 8,000.- by a museum in Scotland, and the Scots thought it was money thrown away.
More recently Spain tried to buy the painting back for US$ 80 000 000, but the Scots refused. I can’t remember the source of this story. —  Si non è vero, è ben trovato: if it is not true, it is very well made up.

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Meanwhile, he found out how to combine flawless precision with wild fantasies that he said were a key to his subconscious mind. —

Currently  he is best remembered for his floppy watches, lonely crutches, desert landscapes, and other loony or macabre or ghastly visions.

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dalí the elephants

And he probably put his signature on several thousand empty papers which he sold to an art dealer to be printed  later and peddled as “hand-signed”.

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Dalí’s spidery elephants are highly popular. They are even sold as tatoos.

Quote Dalí:

People are all the time asking whether I am serious or not.

They don’t  need to know that any more than I do.

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Crossing the River of Death

tn_ref-dali-purgatorcanto_2.jpg

This is Dalí’s version of the ferryman taking the souls across the river of Death. It is part of his work illustrating Dante’s Divine Comedy.

In Dante’s poetry they end up at the gates of Hell where they read the welcome mat :

This is the door to the city of eternal sorrow. Give up all hope, you who go in:

Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch’entrate.

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Young Woman at the Window

dalí woman-at-window.ii

Muchacha en la ventana. There are two versions, and both are at the Reina Sofia en Madrid. The photos are by ghD.

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Dalí was born in 1904 and died in 1989.

There are lots of scandal stories about him. He was expelled from Barcelona’s painting school just before his final exams, when he stated that no one on the faculty was competent to examine him. —

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Dalí’s Father

Dalí’s father, a lawyer and notary as seen and painted by Dalí; the painting is at the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid; the photo is by ghD

He publicly insulted his dead mother’s memory and insulted his father who disinherited him, and also insulted US public opinion with some bizarre joke.

This way he made a legend of himself and also of his wife , muse, and manager Gala. Together they kept  everyone  puzzling about the substance of his work.

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Dalí’s Wife, Gala

Galarina

Gala was a Russian immigrant, Elena Ivanovna Diakonova. She was Dalí’s gifted business partner  and was well known in artists’ circles for her affairs with younger men.

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There are Dalí collections  at St. Petersburg, Florida, and at his home town Figueres in Spain with a great slideshow online. He designed jewelry and also chairs :

imagesjewel.jpeg

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dali visàvis….Notice the snake?

Dalí chair with shoes and snake

He also designed industrial logos and some labels:

Chupa-chups.svg

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The Persistence of Memory

Dalí said that the vision of the melting watches came to him when a piece of Camembert melted on his plate at a local restaurant in summer on the coast.

The Simpsons and Dalí

Simpsons-Dali-Style-persistence

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The_Persistence_of_Memory

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It is by now Dalí’s most popular work,  This is Ch. Madden‘s version of it:

tn_dali-watch

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The original large version of this photo is at  http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dal%C3%AD.Rinoceronte.JPG

As a painter Dalí never reached the fame enjoyed by Picasso, but as an individual he has remained considerably more alive.

Dalí is irresistible. Picasso’s cool genius can just stand by and watch.

Picasso, too, managed to get out of the gallery circus and become known the world over, more famous than Dalí, but he never created the same  waves of delight or surprise and indignation.

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There are great, practically unknown illustrations by Dalí at http://www.rogallery.com/Dali_Salvador/dali-portal.html , lots of shoddy work, but also some very great things like the one below:

The sinner who is going to be torn to pieces according to Dante’s great poem about Hell.

Dalí’s illustrations are mostly woodcuts.

See the Modern Art Museum info pages about printing techniques http://www.moma.org/interactives/projects/2001/whatisaprint/flash.html

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Comments»

1. techn56 - July 14, 2009

WOW
I think he is the greatest.

2. Bjørg Nina - May 25, 2010

Heisann!

Do you know who is standing by the window in the painting Figure by the window 1925. Is it Dali´s sister or his vife Gala.
Some texts say his sister Ana Maria, others say Gala. The view must be from the house at Port Lligat???
Do you know the answers?

3. cantueso - May 26, 2010

I have never tried to find out, but would assume it is Dalí’s sister, because the painting is one of the earlier works, about 1925, and Gala came a little later.

4. Carl D'Agostino - April 13, 2012

Unique imaginative genius

5. Dana - September 11, 2014

Hi, I think your website might be having browser compatibility issues.

When I look at your blog in Safari, it looks fine but when opening in Internet Explorer, it has some overlapping.

I just wanted to give you a quick heads up! Other then that,
superb blog!


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