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How was Bread Invented ? April 22, 2016

Posted by anagasto in history, photography.
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Cereals became basic around 10,000 years ago when some people discovered how to domesticate wheat and barley, but bread has always been and still is very complicated and long to produce.

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— First they had to invent ploughing.

The farmer wears the reins around his own neck!

Photo by Ralf Roletschek at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Farmer_plowing_in_Fahrenwalde,_Mecklenburg-Vorpommern,_Germany.jpg underAttribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

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Water buffalo by paulrudd under the CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license at  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Child_and_ox_ploughing,_Laos_%281%29.jpg

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— Next they had to find out about threshing.

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From the Bible:

Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn.

The law means that you must not allow workers to be hampered by greed, and animals must not be treated like machines.

Some people muzzled their oxen to prevent them from eating while working.—

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And then  Grinding

— And then they invented the mill stone and later the mill  to make flour.

http://www.archive.org/details/bookofdartmoor00baririch released to public domain by  Sabine Baring-Gould at
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Method_of_Using_the_Mill-stone._Section-A_Book_of_Dartmoor.jpg

There are two stones, one on top of the other.

On the lower stone or bedstone you spread the grain, and you turn the upper stone or runner round and round manually or with the help of a donkey.

It is in Estonia. See http://www.7is7.com/otto/estonia/harju_windmill.html

And later they invented the gear to transmit the movement of the axle to the millstone:

Photo by Ralf Pfeifer at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kronrad2.jpg under the CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.  —

Below: these must be the best GIFs I have ever seen.

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That little windmill is in the backgroundof Bruegel’s The Way Up to Calvary. It seems to sit on a shaft with a wooden base. It has to  turn to catch the wind, but it does look like a high  risk venture. This is in the Netherlands. There must be big storms there, because the land is all flat (they say).
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And at one point they discovered Leavening

A small pack of compressed fresh yeast from the supermarket.

It must have been by accident that they found out about those fungi called yeast that  ferment and raise the dough.

Bread can be made without yeast. Remember Exodus 12:15  — For seven days you are to eat bread made without yeast —  the origin of the Passover celebrations among Jewish people and Communion among various Christian denominations.

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Finally, mixing  flour and yeast with water and let it rise before baking it in your kitchen or at the bakery: it is not an easy process!

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How much ground

would you have to plough to make bread enough to feed a family all year long?

But these are modern stats!

Without machines the yield would be much less.

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How to make bread

Here is a simplified method which works very well: no kneading.

1. Put yeast and a little sugar in 1 cup of lukewarm water.

2. Mix in 3 cups of flour and some salt, cover and let it sit. In about an hour it will rise to nearly twice its volume. .

3. Get a baking tray. Oil it a little and cover the oil with flour. This will prevent the bread from sticking to the tray.

4. Put the dough on the tray and put that in the oven and let it rise again.

5. Set the oven to high heat (not maximum) and bake for about 40 minutes. If you are not sure it is done, leave it in a little longer.

In winter or for Christmas you could add sugar, cinnamon, dates or figs, raisins and other dried or glazed fruits  cut into small pieces. Use milk instead of water.

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How to make unleavened bread

1 cup whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup of water

Unless you mean to use it for a religious celebration, add salt or sugar, cinnamon, raisins or other  dried or glazed fruits.

Combine all, knead for a few minutes with the help of two knives and roll it out on a greased cookie sheet. Preheat the oven and bake at 350°F oven for 20 minutes.

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This is how things are done now …. in the US and  Europe.

A modern plough for a cotton field: the cab is climate controlled and has a radio with the AM/FM/Weather Radio bands :-)

The photo by Jesster79 is under the CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:JDTractor_chisel-plough.jpg

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Comments»

1. Javier - November 10, 2012

And what about unleavened bread? It ought to be mentioned in this context, since it is centrical to some Jewish and Christian celebrations.

2. http://yahoo.com - February 9, 2013

I really seem to go along with pretty much everything that has
been posted throughout “Do not muzzle the ox | F I S H I N G”.
Thank you for pretty much all the advice.
Thanks for your effort,Eldon

3. Berliner - February 15, 2013

I didn’t know there was any advice of mine, because I hope you see that “don’t muzzle the ox” is Biblical.

4. writer 267 - February 15, 2013

Basically it means that censorship is bad. Let people say what they want to.

5. public chat - September 6, 2013

Hello, i think that i saw you visited my site so i came tto
“return the favor”.I’m trying to find things to improve my site!I suppose its
ok to use a few of your ideas!!


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