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Xmas vs Christmas December 26, 2015

Posted by anagasto in art, history, language.
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Those who worry about the public meaning of 24/12  ought to consider what is sold as art to celebrate  “the Season”. Most of it seems to be meant for the mules, whereas X as a symbol for “Christ” dates back to early Christians.

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When the New Testament was being composed, Greek was the world language, just as English is now.
The term  Christ  is Greek and means the Anointed.

and this is how it is written in Greek 

It is not a name, but a title, and the abbreviation has been around for more than 1000 years.

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The sign is called a labarum or the Chi-Rho. It represents the  first two letters of Christ written in Greek: there is an X and an R.

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By the 4th and 5th centuries the sign had become part of formal inscriptions, coins, mosaic decoration, graffiti, Bible illustration, and also  stone sculpture. The base relief below is from Spain.

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However, if you google for  Christmas

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you do get pictures that are slightly less miserable than those you see for Xmas

Either way the  idea seems to be to glorify a fir tree.

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There you see the same Christ sign scratched into a stone plate by unskilled hands.

What would Christ’s  name have been; what would his friends have called him?

It was Y’shuah or Joshua, and the Greek adaptation made it into Jesus.

See Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeshua_%28name%29#Original_name_for_Jesus

You would realize that in every language his name is said differently.


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Comments»

1. Carl D'Agostino - November 26, 2011

People should not be offended by use of Xmas as you have “illustrated” very clearly.

2. Endale Tezazu (@EndaleTezazu) - January 8, 2014

I need to know more for the reason why some people use Xmas instead of Christmas; it is better we use Christmas as it is in the beginning.


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