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Alberti’s Lullaby of the Woodcutter September 12, 2015

Posted by anagasto in photography, poetry.
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This is Rafael Alberti’s cradle song of the wood cutter:

Woodcutter,
Don’t fell the pine;
There is a home
Asleep in its top:
Mrs Hoopoe
Mr. Sparrow,
And my sister, the Lark,
the niece of the Nightingale.

But you tailless Kingfisher,
And you, sad and motionless Curlew:
Fly,
birds,
out to the sea!
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>>> >> Versión en español >>> >>  http://anagasto.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/alberti-nana-del-lenador/     
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rafael-alberti original Spanish:

Leñador,
no tales el pino,
que un hogar
hay dormido en su copa.
Señora abubilla,
señor gorrión,
hermana mía calandria,
sobrina del ruiseñor.
Ave sin cola,
martín pescador,
parado y triste alcaraván:
¡a volar,
pajaritos,
al mar!

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alberti-22

Alberti also wrote  The Lullaby of the Tortoise.

He was born in 1902.  Because of the civil war he fled to Argentina, but came back to Spain in 1977  when Spain under Juan Carlos changed course and became a democracy.

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This is the Hoopoe.

The original drawing is at HowStuffWorks.com. http://animals.howstuffworks.com/birds/hoopoe-info.htm ..

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And below is a Sparrow

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and a sparrow’s chick

photographed by JerichoKane and published under a Creative Commons Attribution license at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sparrowchick.JPG

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Then comes the lark —  according to http://animals.howstuffworks.com/birds/nightingale-info.htm

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and the nightingale — according to  http://animals.howstuffworks.com/birds/lark-info.htm

… …

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And finally Alberti addresses  the tailless Kingfisher

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photographed by Pkhun and published under license of CC Attribution at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ceyx_erithaca.JPG

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photographed by markaharper1 and published under license of  CC Attribution at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Syma_torotoro.jpg

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and the motionless Curlew

photographed and released into public domain by by Alan D. Wilson at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Curlew_-_natures_pics.jpg

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Postscript

I looked up the origin of the name “nightingale”. It is night + gale as related to yell.  — There is a  dictionary at http://www.etymonline.com/ where you find the origin of nearly all the words and names of the English language.

Notice the neat presentation:

etymology nightingale

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Comments»

1. Artswebshow - June 29, 2010

these images are excellent.
Nice poem too

2. hitman - October 10, 2011

This is his best, though maybe if I could read him in Spanish I would think differently

3. remember - July 17, 2012

I think it is one of his greatest, though it is so simple that I would find it hard to say what its secret is.

4. remember - July 17, 2012

However, it was also a good idea of yours to add all those photos to give the little poem a little more weight in these sad times of comparative logics.
:)


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