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Death of Saul January 19, 2015

Posted by anagasto in art, painting.
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One of Bruegel’s most famous paintings, the Suicide of Saul, is based on the Biblical account  of  1 Samuel 31
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It is typical of Bruegel to play with the focus of his paintings and let the subject appear small in a large context including lots of people and a distant horizon.
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Saul lived about 3000 years ago. He was anointed as the first king of Israel, though God had warned against the idea of  a monarchy.

There was a war against the Philistines, and Saul led his people in battle, but he was not successful, and he killed himself by falling on his sword to avoid getting captured.

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Saul had at  times been  troubled by dark dreams, and David was called  to play the harp.

Saul had three sons, but they had died in the battle against the Philistines, and David became Saul’s successor and Israel’s most famous king.

In the painting below he is seen playing the harp beside Saul who is on his bed listening and thinking.

By Julius Kronberg, in public domain.

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Comments»

1. Carl D'Agostino - July 7, 2012

David is so very flawed. It seems all great people have a dark side. I take that back. There are many that do not.

2. cantueso - July 8, 2012

People have to be judged by the best they did, not by their faults. Faults are so common that they are only of statistical interest. The best that some have done is often unique, one of its kind, never to be seen again.

Notice however that most people do exactly the opposite, watching out for misdeeds and reading about nothing else. Why is that?

3. Carl D'Agostino - July 11, 2012

For some it is a type of voyeurism. For others pointing the finger allows them the delusion of casting their own darkness as comparatively insignificant, For some people and rightly so the dark side overshadows the good. Half the great men that founded the great democracy ,the United States, were slaveholders.


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