jump to navigation

Don Quixote, drawn and painted December 3, 2014

Posted by anagasto in drawing, painting, Spain.
trackback

.

A man who had read one too many bestsellers decided to go out into the real world to look for  fame of the kind he had seen in those books.

picasso-quixote.jpg

He improvised a suit of armor and called himself  Don Quixote de la Mancha.

>>> >> Versión en español  > > Don  Quijote  dibujado  y  pintado

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

...

He talked a farm worker called Sancho Panza meaning Sancho The Potbelly  into joining him as an assistant.

Don Quixote rode an old horse renamed Rocinante meaning Formerly Old Horse, and Sancho followed him on his little anonymous donkey.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

quijote-1

Together, they crossed the vast empty Mancha.

Don Quixote attacked the windmills and also a herd of sheep. To him they were powerful magicians and famous armies.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

quixo-panza

This is just after the fateful battle with the windmills.

The Quixote fell off the horse and Sancho is holding on to his frightened donkey.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

Sometimes they spend the night at a camp fire.

quijote and sancho by the camp fire

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

quijote the meseta

.

Sometimes they ride for days with Don Quixote developing long theories based on the bestsellers he had read and Sancho trying to listen.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

honore-daumier-don-quixote

By now the novel is the teachers’ and publishers’ potboiler.

Its endless satire is lost on modern readers, its parodies much too long, its second part aimless.

But the novel is still loudly applauded by leading literary figures, educators, and small politicians.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

tn_dqwindmill1

In Cervantes’ time even the poorest people, all illiterate, had endless fun with that story, its brutal jokes, its parodies, even with its complicated, histrionic language.

And the beginning is so simple as an idea and so great to remember that everybody keeps coming back to it. —

new7quijote

.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

Two typical scenes:

El Quixote arrived at a little roadside inn that he understood to be a castle. The girls were scared.

Castles never charge their noble visitors for bed and breakfast. Accordingly Don Quixote politely took leave, but refused to pay. Sancho Panza got beat up.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

The Picasso drawing is from AllPosters.com.
The pen and ink drawings are by Gustave Doré and Honoré Daumier.
The colour pictures and the photos are by ghD.

don-quixote

There are books in Sancho’s saddle bags. Maybe he has to learn English.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

tn_throwing-out-books

The author’s original intention was to parody the bestsellers of his time.

Here you see the village priest and a helper sort through Quixote’s books to throw out the bestsellers he was reading.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

The Quixote is free online in English and in Spanish

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

The most famous quote, “Con la iglesia hemos dado, Sancho” is from Don Quixote second part, chapter IX : “Sancho, we are up against the Church.”

.

.

Comments»

1. Tuesday Teaser: Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes | The Lit Witch: A Book Blog - April 5, 2011

[…] Quixote drawn, painted, photographed (espliego.wordpress.com) […]

2. The biggest book you’ve ever read?… « Blog Rest and Play - December 7, 2011

[…] Quixote, painted, photographed (espliego.wordpress.com) […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s