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Who got the stolen cheese? June 13, 2014

Posted by anagasto in drawing, poetry.
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crow got the cheese 1

In a garden there was a table, on the table there was a piece of cheese.
A crow saw it.
He went and got the cheese and took it to the top of a tree.

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>>>>> German version >> Krähe  Fuchs  und  Käse
>>>>> Versión en español >> El   cuervo  y  el  zorro

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fox viewing cheese

Just then a fox came.
He saw the crow and the cheese  and he thought:
This cheese must be very good!

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fox speaking

And so the fox said to the crow:
Good morning, pretty Crow, how are you ?
Your feathers are  so very pretty.
People say that your voice is even prettier  than your feathers. Could that be true ?

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crow singing for the fox

Oh yes, it is. Listen.

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whosecheese1.jpg

When the crow began to sing, the cheese fell down to the street where the fox was waiting.
The fox took the cheese and said to the crow:

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crow lost cheese

Hey, old Crow! You lost your cheese this time.
It is the price that you pay for a lesson that I am going to give you:
It is  expensive to listen to a flatterer !

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Und voici  rhymed in English:

A Crow, her hunger to appease,
Had from a window stolen some cheese,
And sitting on a lofty pine
In state, was just about to dine.
This, when a Fox observed below…

→  → http://tinyurl.com/abyra9

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The story is by Aesop.
The most famous version is by Lafontaine:

Maître Corbeau, sur un arbre perché,
Tenait en son bec un fromage.
Maître Renard, par l’odeur alléché,
Lui tint à peu près ce langage :
“Hé ! bonjour, Monsieur du Corbeau.
Que vous êtes joli ! que vous me semblez beau !”

>>>>> MP3 of a French actor reading

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For a thousand years Latin was the international language, and so the fox and the crow conversed in these words :

‘O qui tuarum, corve, pinnarum est nitor!
Quantum decoris corpore et vultu geris!
Si vocem haberes, nulla prior ales foret’.

→ → Vulpis et Corvus

and ends up saying:
“Corvi deceptus stupor”.

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Comments»

1. David - January 31, 2008

The moral of this story:

Don’t try to sing while you’re eating cheese.

2. cantueso - January 31, 2008

No. The moral of the story is that if you are a crow and want to sing while eating cheese, you must hold your cheese with your feet. — The most difficult of the Aesops is the donkey and the lion. Could you please let me know what the moral is of that fable?

3. David - January 31, 2008

Hold your cheese with your feet?! EEWWWW!!

Donkey and lion, hhmmmm, … [thinking noises] …

4. cantueso - January 31, 2008

Many of his fables are cruel, some are cynical, and at least one is really funny. I keep wondering whether this fox that longs for grapes is the result of multiple translation.

As to the story of the donkey who laughed in the lion’s face…
I would think it is that fear attracts the arrow, and a bad conscience does, too.

5. David - February 1, 2008

“…fear attracts the arrow …” what a lovely way to put it!

Foxes are quite the omnivores you know. How do you work the translation of that fable?

6. cantueso - February 1, 2008

???
I thought that “fear attracts the arrow” is an American saying.

The prose version is from the Gutenberg site, the rhymed one from a forum. The most famous version is LaFontaine’s which begins with “Maître Corbeau sur un arbre perché”.

I think all French children know Maître Corbeau by heart (and recite it with their hand on their heart, mentally.)

7. David - February 1, 2008

I’m not nearly as literate as you cantueso, but rather somewhat literal. I thought you meant that there was something wrong with the idea of a fox wanting to eat grapes.

“Fear attracts the arrow” may well be an American saying, but not one that I’ve heard. Perhaps it’s from the wild wild west. I’m a northeasterner.

8. cantueso - February 2, 2008

Yes, I did think that the fox who longs for grapes was either surrealistic or another twist of the story: that the fox would insistently try to get something that in fact he does not want, which happens rather often.

I know that cats eat certain types of grass, and mine loved zucchini peelings, but that a fox would eat grapes I find rather startling (aka WOW).

9. septembersky - May 1, 2009

But the story is about a “corbeau”, which is a raven. A crow is not the same as a raven. A raven is larger, in fact about the size of a hawk, and a crow is only about as big as a dove.

10. 223remote - December 29, 2009

The drawings are great.

11. yamique - January 6, 2010

Los dibujos no son los mismos dibujos que en el otro blog


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